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Home>  Dig.Jain Dharma>> Dreams of Mother Trishala  
   

   
        

  Trishala, the mother of Lord Mahavira was  a member of the Kshatriya caste. She was the eldest daughter of Chetaka, the King of the republic of Vaishali. Trishala had seven sisters, one of whom was initiated into the Jain order of ascetics while the other six married famous kings. Lord Mahavira's mother Trishala  and his father King Siddharth of Kundgraam were followers of Parshvanath, the 23rd Jain Tirthankar. According to Jain texts, Trishala carried her son for nine months and seven and a half days during the sixth century BC. However, Shvetambar Jains believe that he was conceived by Devananda. 
  According to the Jain scriptures, Trishala had 16 dreams in the Digambara sect and in Shvetabar sect she had fourteen dreams after the conception of her son. After having these dreams she woke her husband King Siddharth and told him about the dreams.

 
  16 dreams of Mother 
  Trishala.

  The next day Siddharth summoned the scholars of the court and asked them to explain the meaning of the dreams.  According to the scholars, these dreams meant that the child would be born very strong, courageous, and full of virtue. The dreams were: 
Dream of an elephant 
Dream of an bull 
Dream of an lion 
Dream of Laxmi 
Dream of flowers 
Dream of a full moon 
Dream of the sun 
Dream of a large banner 
Dream of a silver urn 
Dream of a lake filled with lotuses 
Dream of a milky-white sea 
Dream of a celestial vehicle 
Dream of a heap of gems 
Dream of a fire without smoke 
Dream of a pair of fish (Digambara) 
Dream of a throne (Digambara) 

     

  

    

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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